KNOW…The Autism – Vaccine Connection

Autism is a disease involving the brain, the immune system, and the gastrointestinal tract. Once an uncommon disorder in the United States, the incidence of autism is now occurring at epidemic rates. Whereas during the 1970′s one in 10,000 children developed autism, it now affects as many as one in 150. What could explain this alarming trend?

Given the growing burden this epidemic is putting upon both our health care and school systems, it would be informative to know what causes this frightening disease. One might assume that genetics is the culprit since no other cause is offered. However, one might also ask how it is possible to have such an epidemic based solely on genetics. The fact is we are rarely invited to debate the controversy over the nature of this epidemic because the most plausible cause, which relates to changes in vaccination programs over the past three decades, is not readily accepted by a public that believes vaccination is safe, effective and health promoting.

While it is certain that genetics predisposes individuals to certain diseases, as with all pathology the triggers for disease involve immune system dysfunction brought about by dietary deficiencies and/or environmental stress. In the case of autism, research shows that a high percentage of those affected are victims of massive chemical toxicity. The neurological damage that is characteristic with autism is strikingly similar to the well-established side effects of mercury, aluminum and formaldehyde toxicity. These neurotoxins are common vaccine ingredients.

During the 1940′s and 50′s when only some of the population was exposed to only a few vaccines, autism was primarily confined to the upper and upper-middle socioeconomic classes, those who could afford good health care and the cost of vaccination.

During the 1970′s and 80′s, the federal government established goals for improving vaccination rates. To achieve high vaccination rates (97%), the government implemented nationwide vaccine initiatives, which included offering federal grants to states and encouraging strict enforcement (state mandates for forced vaccination). During this time period, the number of mandated vaccines gradually increased (from 8 in 1980 to 22 in 2000) as vaccination became a requirement for a much younger population (the majority of all 30 childhood vaccines are administered before the age of 18 months). Only after these developments did autism cross class lines. Today autism is widespread in all socioeconomic groups.

The way in which autism developed in children changed after the mid-1980′s. Parents began reporting that their children developed normally during the first year and half and THEN became autistic. It is a fact that most vaccines contain toxic mercury, many of them grossly in excess of EPA permissible standards for ADULTS!

In 1979, the mercury-containing MMR was added to the vaccine schedule. In 1988, the mercury-containing HIB vaccine was added. Mercury-containing Hepatitis B for newborns was added in the early 1990′s. Children receive all these vaccines, plus mercury-containing DTP, in three to four toxic doses during the first year and a half of their fragile lives, and the vaccines are usually administered simultaneously (multiple mercury-containing vaccines on the same day).

These facts beg the question: At what point does an immature immune system reach a saturation point for toxic chemicals injected into the blood stream? When mercury can’t get processed out of body, it travels to the brain where it clings to tissue in the cerebellum (affecting movement and balance), in the amygdala (affecting emotional processing) and in the hippocampus (affecting the formation, sorting and storage of information). The strong correlation between autism and vaccine history becomes even more credible when the disease characteristics for both autism and mercury poisoning are compared:

The Autism – Vaccine Connection: Comparison of Characteristics

AUTISM MERCURY POISONING
Motor Skills and Movement Disorders Uncoordinated; clumsiness; rocking; circling; flaps arms; walks on toes; difficulty with walking, sitting, crawling; difficulty with swallowing or chewing Uncoordinated; clumsiness; rocking; circling; flaps arms; walks on toes; difficulty with walking or sitting; difficulty with swallowing or chewing
Sensory Disorders Oversensitive to sound; does not like to be touched; abnormal sensations in mouth, arms and legs Oversensitive to sound; does not like to be touched; abnormal sensations in mouth, arms and legs
Speech, Hearing & Language Development Delayed language or failure to develop speech; problems with articulation; mild to severe hearing loss; word use errors Loss of speech or failure to develop speech; problems with articulation; mild to severe hearing loss; word retrieval problems
Cognitive Ability Borderline intelligence; mental retardation (may be reversed); poor concentration and attention; difficulty following complex commands; difficulty with word comprehension; difficulty with understanding abstract ideas and symbols Borderline intelligence; mental retardation (may be reversed); poor concentration and attention; difficulty following complex commands; difficulty with word comprehension; difficulty with understanding abstract ideas and symbols
Physical Characteristics and Functional Disturbances Weakening muscle strength, especially upper body; rash, dermatitis; abnormal sweating; poor circulation and high heart rate; diarrhea, constipation, abdominal discomfort and incontinence; anorexia; seizures; tendency to have allergies and asthma; family history of autoimmune symptoms, especially rheumatoid arthritis Weakening muscle strength, especially upper body; rash, dermatitis; abnormal sweating; poor circulation and high heart rate; diarrhea, constipation, abdominal discomfort and incontinence; anorexia; seizures; tendency to have allergies and asthma; more likely to have autoimmune symptoms, especially rheumatoid arthritis
Behavior Difficulty sleeping; staring and unprovoked crying; injures self (such as head banging); social isolation Difficulty sleeping; staring and unprovoked crying; injures self (such as head banging); social isolation
Visual Problems Poor eye contact; blurred vision Poor eye contact; blurred vision